Showing posts with label Destinations. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Destinations. Show all posts

TOUR AROUND KERINCI

Day ZERO - From Iport To Home Stay

Day 1 - Sungai Penuh

Arrive in Sungai Penuh and head straight to your homestay to meet the family and drop off your things.
Some activities to do in town:

  • Walk through the old neighborhood of Pondok Tinggi filled with traditional Kerinci longhouses. Head to the nearby Mesjid Agung. Built in the traditional style in 1874, it’s the oldest mosque in town, and still actively used.
  • Visit the lively Pasar, or wet/dry market, in the center of town. Get some Sarabi and other goodies for breakfast.
  • From the Pasar, grab a Bendi (horse drawn carriage) to some of the nearby batik workshops where you can watch the creation process (and maybe even participate!).
  • Take a motorcycle ride up to Bukit Khayangan or hike up the hill behind Sungai Penuh to get a beautiful view of the Kerinci valley from Mt. Kerinci in the north, to Lake Kerinci in the south.
  • In the late afternoon, head to Bukit Sentiong on the edge of town for the grilled corn stands and a nice view of Sungai Penuh and the Kerinci valley at sunset.
  • In the evening, visit Pasar Malam, the carnival-like night market, to eat Martabak, Sate, and other lovely street foods.
  • Drive up to Tapan Hill at night for some wildlife spotlighting (an additional cost for renting a vehicle and driver).



Day 2 - Danau Kerinci and Lempur

  • In the morning, head to the village of Pulau Tengah on the edge of Kerinci Lake. Meet up with some fisherman there for some canoe rides and to watch/participate with them as they fish.
  • Visit an English class at the local high school in the village.
  • Stop for lunch at one of the restaurants that sits atop or next to the lake.
  • Head further south to the hills around Lempur to see cinnamon farmers at work.
  • Explore the village of Lempur and the nearby lake of Danau Lingkat to take a ride on the bamboo rafts and enjoy the scenery.
  • In the evening, follow a local honey hunter as they harvest honey from wild Indonesian honeybees.
  • Meet up with your host family in Lempur and turn in for the night.



Day 3 - Lempur to Kayu Aro

  • After breakfast, head to the rice fields to watch the farmers plant and harvest the Lempur heirloom rice Beras Payo. Participate if you want to get your hands dirty!
  • Say goodbye to Lempur and head up to the Kayu Aro area. Don’t forget to pick up some Dendeng Batokok, grilled beef strips from heaven native to the area, in the town of Siulak Deras on the way up.
  • Walk through the endless green tea fields and take a tour of the old tea factory in village of Bedeng VIII (Delapan).
  • Eat lunch in Aroma Pecco, a small pond and oasis in the middle of the largest tea plantation in the world.
  • Visit the sugar processing ‘factory’ (really just some people in a shed pressing and boiling raw sugar cane juice).
  • Explore the coffee farms that are switching over to organic Arabica coffee with the help of a local NGO.
  • Head to the village of Pelompek and meet your host family.
  • Explore the village and check out the other highland farms in the area that produce cabbage, potatoes, chilis, etc.
  • Head back to your homestay for dinner and turn in for the night.

Last Day  - Back to Iport

 

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Pasumpahan Island

PASUMPAHAN ISLAND

Pasumpahan island is one of the tourist sites in the city of Padang, with an area of ​​5 hectares, Pasumpahan island has a beach with white sand and clear sea water ready for your visit. Not only that, the appeal of the underwater coral reefs are still awake you shall see with snorkeling or diving.

There are several points of dive sites that can be visited by tourists around Pasumpahanisland include Gosong Island, Snake Island, Sirandah Island and Pandan Island. For those who can not dive, you can walk around the island to enjoy its natural beauty. Don’t forget to bring a camera to capture the beauty.




Transportation

Located in the South Coast area of ​​West Sumatra, approximately 45 km from the city of Padang and about 200 meters from the Sikuai island. From Padang, first you use a motor vehicle to the direction of the Bungus Port precisely Banana Beach. The entrance to the Banana beach through an alley after Pertamina base. 






Accommodation

Pasumpahan island don’t have lodgings for tourists. Most opt ​​for camping in the middle of the island using tents. If camping is not your taste, there Bungus In the port named Tin Tin Homestay accommodation that provide tours to the nearby islands, including Pasumpahan Rp .500,000 / person.




Tips
Due Pasumpahan island is uninhabited island, so we recommend you bring food and drink enough, especially if you are camping.

THE BUKIT DUABELAS NATIONAL PARK OF JAMBI (Primitif)


THE BUKIT DUABELAS NATIONAL PARK OF JAMBI (Primitif)





OVERVIEW

The Bukit Duabelas National Park in the province of Jambi is a relatively small park among Indonesia’s large national parks. Covering only 60,500 hectares, the Park was only recently established in the year 2000, mainly to allow the regrowth of secondary forests and to protect the home of the forest people known as the Kubu, sometimes called Suku Anak Dalam or orang Rimba. European anthropologists have called them Kubu bat since this is felt to be demeaning, tribe members call themselves Orang Rimba meaning People or Children of the Jungle.


The northern part of the Park is primary jungle, but the remainder are tracts of land that were formerly deforested, or were production forests that have now been reforested and allowed to revert to tropical rainforests. The Park is in fact a most important water catchment area for the province.  

Bukit Duabelas, literally translated meaning the Twelve Hills, is a lowland park with undulating contours. This is the habitat of some of Sumatra’s endangered species including tapirs, gibbons, clouded leopards, sun bears, wild cats and crested serpent eagles.  There are also endangered plant species. 


The Orang Rimba or otherwise known as the orang “Kubu”,  are an isolated tribe who have lived within these jungles for years and have continued to live the simple life from nature. There are several theories and legends as to who they are and where they come from.


One story relates that when the Sultan of Palembang (now South Sumatra) held continuous feuds with the Sultan of Jambi, the Jambi Sultan asked for help from the Sultan of Pagaruyung (now in the province of West Sumatra), who then sent soldiers to Jambi.  On their way to Jambi a group of  the Minangkabau soldiers lost their way in the dense jungles and never found their way out. They then established themselves here, living a simple life in the Jambi jungles.


Another story says that the Kubu were pirates along the Indian Ocean, who sought refuge in these rainforests.


Another ethnologist, however, believes that the Orang Rimba are Wedoids similar to those living in the southern Indian subcontinent, who can be identified by their tall posture, curly hair, rather dark skin and deep set eyes. These could have been soldiers, mercenaries paid by the Sultan of Jambi in the fight against the Sultan of Palembang, who have later stayed and settled in the territory.


The Anak Dalam tribe lives in and from the forest, and survives chiefly on hunting, gathering, agriculture and fishing.


Today, a number of travel agents in Jambi offer tours to visit the Anak Dalam of Jambi in the Bukit Duabelas National Park.

ACTIVITIES
TO STAY,
TO STAY

To visit the Park one best stay two or three nights. There are no hotels in or near the park but there are simple lodgings available for visitors.

GETTING THERE AND AROUND
GET THERE
To get to the Park, you must first fly to the province’s capital city, Jambi.  There are regular flights from Jakarta, Medan and Batam to Jambi. The Park is some 180 km from Jambi’s airport, and it takes around 5 to 6 hours’ drive to reach the park.


To enter the National Park, you must first have a permit from the Park’s authorities. Travel agents can obtain your permit, guide you through the Park and visit the village of the Anak Dalam.

Danau Gunung (Mt.) Tujuh

This mountain is just across from Mt. Kerinci, but is a much easier (3-4 hour) hike. At about 2,000 meters you will find a large, pristine crater lake surrounded by virgin rainforest and seven mountain peaks that rise for another 800 meters or so. It’s the highest volcanic crater lake in SE Asia. At the top, if your guide has arranged for it ahead of time, you can rent some of the local fisherman’s dugout canoes and paddle across the lake to set up camp.



Gunung Tujuh is a massive, extinct volcano whose eruption in ancient times blew apart the top of the mountain, eventually forming a large, 4.5 km long lake in the crater left behind. Being completely within the Kerinci Seblat National Park, the surrounding peaks (of which there are 7 – hence the name “Tujuh” in Indonesian), are covered in primary rainforest, and home to a wide variety of birds and wildlife. Supposedly, the lake, at around 2000 meters, is the highest in Southeast Asia. Being up there, with the clouds clinging to the primeval forests all around, it truly feels like you’ve stepped into a prehistoric lost world.


Ladeh Panjang : The highest wetlands in Southeast Asia



The Ladeh Panjang Wetlands, at the western foot of Mt. Kerinci and deep within the Kerinci Seblat National Park, is the highest wetlands in Southeast Asia at over 2000 meters in elevation. The trail there takes about 6 hours or less of fairly easy hiking, with four of those hours through primary rain forest of the Kerinci Seblat National Park. Two lakes can be found within the 150 hectares of wetlands, Danau Singkarak and Danau Sakti, the latter of which takes a further three hours to reach. The marshlands and the primary forest surrounding it are home to a wide variety of wildlife, including barking deer, tapir, and tigers. 


Mt. Kerinci

Mt. Kerinci is the highest volcano in Sumatra island. its about 3,805m above sea level. the creates wall is of 600m x 580m, the temperature is about 5'C on the top of Mt. Kerinci and visited but climbers from town especially to celebrate the independence day of Indonesia Republic and New year. To reach the top of Mt. Kerinci can be seen on cleardays billowingsmoke and steam from its rocksrewn summit.
At 3,805m, Gunung (Mt.) Kerinci is Indonesia’s highest non-Papuan peak, and the highest volcano in SE Asia (actually the highest volcano in all of Asia east of Iran and west of the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia).
It takes a good eight hours, depending on your fitness level, to reach the summit. Generally, people start their climb early in the morning and set camp at one of the shelters near the tree line. In the darkness of the next morning, they scramble up the scree towards the summit for another two hours to greet the rising sun and unsurpassed views of the surrounding area.
Climbing the mountain is not the only thing Gunung Kerinci is good for. Its forested slopes are famous amongst birdwatchers and provide primary habitat for a slew of other creatures, including the Sumatran tiger.

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